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Sunday, November 13, 2016

The VSED Exit: A Way to Speed Up Dying, Without Asking Permission

by Paula Span
The New York Times
Originally published October 21, 2016

Here is an excerpt:

In end-of-life circles, this option is called VSED (usually pronounced VEEsed), for voluntarily stopping eating and drinking. It causes death by dehydration, usually within seven to 14 days. To people with serious illnesses who want to hasten their deaths, a small but determined group, VSED can sound like a reasonable exit strategy.

Unlike aid with dying, now legal in five states, it doesn't require governmental action or physicians' authorization. Patients don't need a terminal diagnosis, and they don't have to prove mental capacity. They do need resolve.

"It's for strong-willed, independent people with very supportive families," said Dr. Timothy Quill, a veteran palliative care physician at the University of Rochester Medical Center.

He was speaking at a conference on VSED, billed as the nation's first, at Seattle University School of Law this month. It drew about 220 participants -- physicians and nurses, lawyers, bioethicists, academics of various stripes, theologians, hospice staff. (Disclosure: I was also a speaker, and received an honorarium and some travel costs.)

What the gathering made clear was that much about VSED remains unclear.

Is it legal?

For a mentally competent patient, able to grasp and communicate decisions, probably so, said Thaddeus Pope, director of the Health Law Institute at Mitchell Hamline School of Law in St. Paul, Minn. His research has found no laws expressly prohibiting competent people from VSED, and the right to refuse medical and health care intervention is well established.

The article is here.
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