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Welcome to the nexus of ethics, psychology, morality, philosophy and health care

Friday, July 31, 2015

Can Moral Disputes Be Resolved?

By Alex Rosenberg
The New York Times - Opinion
Originally published July 13, 2015

Here is an excerpt:

The notion that moral judgments are not just true or false claims about human conduct helps explain the failure of ethical theories as far back as Aristotle’s. These theories started out on the wrong foot, by treating morality and immorality as intrinsic to the actions themselves, instead of our responses to them.

Factoring human emotions into moral judgment explains much about them. Why they are held so strongly, why different cultures that shape human emotional responses have such different moral norms, even why people treat abstract ethical disagreement by others as a moral flaw. And most of all, this meta-ethical theory helps us understand why such disputes are sometimes intractable.

Meta-ethics has begun to make use of findings in cognitive social psychology, and in neuroscience, to help understand the nature of ethical claims.

The entire article is here.
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